Home > News from product design > Driving Style of Autonomous Vehicles

Driving Style of Autonomous Vehicles

Jaguar Land Rover investigates how a natural driving styles (meaning driving styles from everyday drivers on the roads) could be adapted into an autonomous vehicle. Basis for the data comes from instrumented vehicles which collect data to understand the everyday driving style and then to apply that into an autonomous vehicle. The research strategy contributes to find a way to make highly automated or autonomous cars more trustworthy. Trust is a challenge for new technology, bound strongly to acceptance of new technology. Certainly, as humans, we tend to trust things more if their behaviour is similar to our own (see also my previous blog on automation and trust). However, the driving style varies dependent on the driver’s personality, experience, driving environment, and purpose of the travel. Occasionally a usually calm driver changes his / her driving style if the purpose of travel is urgent, e.g., a family member is sick and awaits the visit. On another occasion one might just want to enjoy the beautiful landscape without any other specific purpose of travel. That again influences the driving style. Of how much the driving style changes is a question to be answered.

The vehicle could ask for the purpose of travel and try to associate a driving style to that. Asking a user helps in general to understand the intentions of the task that the user wants to do and so to provide better service. However, it involves a trade-off of receiving the knowledge to deliver a better service and asking too much, making the user impatient.

To implement human like behaviour into autonomous cars occurs as trend. I found a report from last year that Google is doing research in that area as well. The report reveals another important reason to adopt human like behaviour in a car. Whereas autonomous cars are great in following rules such a behaviour can result literally in a roadblock in the unexpected environment of everyday travel. A rule is, for example, to never go over double yellow lines marking the edge of the road. Now, if a car parks in a way that another car cannot pass on the street without going over the yellow line a natural driver behaviour would be to just go over the double yellow lines. An autonomous wouldn’t do that. For no understandable reason, for the driver, it would recalculate the route. Another issue is the faster reaction time of autonomous vehicles, letting autonomous vehicles come to an abrupt stop when they sense a pedestrian. It results in a challenge for human drivers behind who are not so fast to react. Implementing adaptive human like strategies in autonomous cars helps them to deal with an environment where not everything is working along the rules, but also makes their behaviour more understanding for a human and brings their skills to level where they can interact safely with human traffic participants surrounding them.

See here for details directly at the Jaguar Land Rover website.

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